Ground Breaking for The Wesleyan Homes at Estrella

We have so many wonderful ministries in the Central Texas Conference that it is hard to keep track of them all.  The list goes on and on!

One of those outstanding ministries is The Wesleyan HomesAll the way back in 1953, leadership in the Central Texas Conference moved forward to establish “homes for the aging.”  Over the years this great ministry (located in Georgetown, Texas) has grown and expanded. In January 2008, a 124 apartment Independent Living facility was opened on a 40 acre campus.  In 2011 the assisted living and memory care apartments were completed.  Last Saturday (December 6th) I had the high privilege and great honor to speaking at the ground breaking service for the next phase of expansion.

With deep appreciation for the ministry of Wesleyan Homes and all who are a part of it, I want to share the following excerpts from my speech at the ground breaking ceremony.

This is indeed a good, even more, a great and significant day.  We break ground in the season of Advent looking forward again to the coming birth of our Savior.  If we reflect on what we are engaged in; if we think about the great ministry of the Wesleyan Homes, we cannot help but reflect that we are about a homecoming; the building of a place of residence and service that becomes, by the grace of God, more than just a physical edifice but a true home to which we are blessed to come.

A couple of years ago a colleague of mine had his choir sing an old secular piece of Christmas music at the start of his sermon one Advent Sunday.  Can you guess what they sang?  They sang that great tune made popular by Bing Crosby “I’ll be Home for Christmas.”  He reported that especially among the World War II generation the song struck a deep chord.  “Former soldiers shared their memories of hearing that tune on a troop ship crossing the Atlantic, in a snowbound Army base in Europe, and on a sun-soaked airstrip in the Pacific. . . . Spouses and parents remembered hearing “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” on the radio as they sat down to Christmas dinner with an empty chair at the table”  (James Harnish, Come Home for Christmas, p. 9). There was something about that song and Crosby’s silky voice that evoked the longing for home.

We too know this longing even separated by three quarters of a century.  This advent, this time of preparation is just such a time.  There beats within us a soul-deep longing for God.  It beckons us to new hope and greater faith.  We are invited to come home; to come home not just to the Wesleyan; to come home not just to family and friends.  Far greater still, we are invited and even urged to come home to the Lord.

The truth is that our journey never really stops simply at ground breaking, even one as important and significant as this.  Our journey continues on at once both back in history and forward in time.  We are invited back to a Bethlehem stable; to kneel and pour forth adoration in heart and voice.  We are invited forward into the future with the advent conviction that Christ is coming again.

Glance with me at the Scripture passage I have chosen for this occasion, Matthew 1:18-23. It is, I suspect, almost too well known by us.  Joseph desires at once to do the compassionate and sensible thing.  He will break off his engagement with Mary.  In a stunning sequence of events an angel of the Lord visits him with both news and instructions.

The news is the joy of this time.  Listen as the Holy Spirit speaks to us again: “the child she carries was conceived by the Holy Spirit. She will give birth to a son, and you will call him Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.”[1]

The instructions are given to Joseph but directed through him to us as well.  “Joseph son of David, don’t be afraid to take Mary as your wife.”[2]  You know the response.  It slides in the passage simply, un-assumedly in verse 24.  “When Joseph woke up, he did just as an angel from God commanded and took Mary as his wife.”[3]  Joseph did as he was instructed.  He was profoundly obedient.  He responded with quiet dignity, great courage and immense faithfulness.

Dignity, courage, and faithfulness are the pointed hallmarks of this lesson from Joseph.  I submit that they are the guiding stake markers of our action today.  We break this ground for a home of dignity.  We turn this earth in courageous commitment to the future.  We dig this foundation in full faithfulness to the One who proclaims that he does and will live among us.

They will, we will, “call him Emmanuel … [which] means “God with us.”[4]

Christ’s coming really is our homecoming!  He is our homecoming right here, right now as we break this ground.  And so . . . with fervor, joy, and assiduity of purpose, we break this ground for a home of dignity.  We turn this earth in courageous commitment to the future.  We dig this foundation in full faithfulness to the One who proclaims that he does and will live among us.

[1]               Matthew 1:20c-21
[2]               Matthew 1:20b
[3]               Matthew 1:24
[4]               Matthew 1:23

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