The Greater Advent Desire

Recently I caught myself in worship singing with full-throated adoration the great Advent hymn “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.”  On this particular Sunday we didn’t just sing the typical first four verses but instead dug deep into verses 6 and 7, which are sung less often.  As I lifted verse 7 in the air, its words forcibly struck me:

O come, Desire of nations bind
All peoples in one heart and mind.
From dust thou brought us forth to life;
Deliver us from earthly strife.
(The United Methodist Hymnal, No. 211, “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel” verse 7)

And then the chorus kicked in with joy and wonder swelling to fill the whole sanctuary.

Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel

In a typical week where violence haunts the land we call holy, parades in brutal excess by ISIS and even stalks our country and nation through civil disturbance, I could not help but wonder.  Is this really the “desire of nations?”

It struck me that often our desire as individuals and nations is not to be bound in “one heart and mind” but rather to be victorious; to have our side or our positon win.  We need not look overseas to behold this warped sense of desire.  As I watched Congress I could not help but wonder if at times our two major parties are more intent on “winning” than on actually helping America.  Confession drives me to face a reality that this can be just as true in the church (and in my own life) among Christians as it can be in our country and wider world.

Singing and meditating on the words we sung, I noticed something.  The preceding verse, verse 6, has been curiously changed.  It reads:

O Come, thou Dayspring, come and cheer
Our spirits by thy justice here;
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night,
And death’s dark shadows put to flight.
(The United Methodist Hymnal, No. 211, “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel,” verse 6)

The change lies in the second line – it used to read “thy advent [instead of justice] here.”  In my musings, I cannot help but wonder if the change is both significant and in grave error.  We sing “O Come, thou Dayspring, come and cheer.”  Dayspring means “dawn.”  The song is a prayer that “death’s dark shadows” may in truth and fact be put to “flight.”  Justice by itself doesn’t put such dark shadows to flight.

Ultimately Advent is about the very coming of Christ; the appearing of our Lord and Savior, ruler and deliver.  As good and as legitimately desired as justice is, we need more than justice.  By ourselves we will never truly be able to achieve true justice.  Rather we need something better, something greater.  We need a Savior.  We need a Lord (ruler) who takes us to justice and beyond; to world bound in one heart and mind.

However anesthetizing it may be to simply drift along with the good cheer of the season, we know in our heart of hearts that this is not enough.  Even the most jaded justice singing partygoer perceives a greater advent desire.  Rightly Dan Schaeffer has written, “Unless we dwell upon this mystery, letting it take center stage, we will chase the true spirit of Christmas to no avail” (Dan Schaeffer, In Search of the Real Spirit of Christmas, p. 145).  Only such spiritual depth will salve the wound in our souls and the ache in our hearts.

Let this great Advent song be our prayer.

O Come, thou Dayspring, come and cheer
Our spirits by thy justice here;
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night,
And death’s dark shadows put to flight.
 O come, Desire of nations bind
All peoples in one heart and mind.
From dust thou brought us forth to life;
Deliver us from earthly strife. 

Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel
(The United Methodist Hymnal, No. 211, “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel” verses 6, 7 and chorus)

Emmanuel, God with us!, is our greater Advent desire.  It is our prayer.  For …

A child is born to us, a son is given to us,
    and authority will be on his shoulders.
    He will be named
    Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,
    Eternal Father, Prince of Peace.
-Isaiah 9:6

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